Wednesday, April 18, 2007

A Little Portrait


Here's a portrait I painted recently of me and my lovely wife Claudia. Its been cold and rainy here in Toronto, so I drew this one up in anticipation of the coming spring weather. We often go walking through the alley ways in Toronto together while I look for reference for my paintings and I thought it'd make a nice scene for a portrait of the two of us. As with most of the other two-tone pieces I've posted here, I painted this one up with coloured ink markers on watercolour paper.

For this drawing, in answer to the occasional emails I get asking about my process, I thought I'd scan the painting during various stages to give an idea of how I go about working in two-tone with markers. So for those interested, I've compiled the various scans and made a few notes to explain how I work, which you can see on the right. You can also see the pencil drawing I did the painting from at the bottom.

And of course, I have to thank Claudia for scanning and colour correcting this one for me. Being a designer and art-director herself, she's a photoshop whiz and often scans and cleans up my work for me...and she did a great job on this one!

19 comments:

Chris Wahl said...

Very educational seeing your process, Michael.

Fantastic work!

Mike Laughead said...

It's great to see your process. The light table thing is smart. (Does it ever hurt your eyes to be staring at the light table for so long.)

Have you ever done the same process digitally? Do you have/use a wacom tablet?

Dominic Bugatto said...

Lovely piece.

Kinda reminds of my old stomping grounds in the lower Annex.

Michael Cho said...

Chris: thanks, Chris. I actually kinda inspired to do this from seeing all the very helpful tutorials you've posted on your blog. Though, I have no idea how to do all the cool video tutorials you've done!

Mike: thanks, Mike. My answers are; 1) no, my eyes don't really hurt from the light table -- I use a low wattage bulb, so its no worse than looking at a tv screen and 2)yes, I used to do the process digitally, a long, long time ago. However, I found it took longer and was also very very boring and tedious to work that way.

Dominic: thanks, Dom. The background in this one is actually made up, but I was kinda thinking of alleys near Harbord and Ossington...so it's almost in the same area.

Jason Chalker said...

Very cool. I really enjoy getting to peek behind the curtain of artists I like. Definitely some cool techniques to file away.

Also, great artwork as always!

Michael Cho said...

Thanks, Jason. Glad I rank among the artists you like. Hope the info into my process is of some help to you.

Paul Conrad said...

Wow Michael....Love seeing the process...
and a great piece too!

Ryan Cody said...

very cool Mike

Chrissie A said...

I loved seeing the steps to this very charming piece, Michael! Excellent work!

Michael Cho said...

Paul: Thanks, Paul. I'm glad you liked seeing how I work on these pieces.

Ryan Cody: thanks, dude. Hope all your current projects are going well for you.

Chrissie A: Thanks, Chrissie. Nice to hear from you -- glad you found seeing the process interesting.

brian said...

Have you mentioned before what size you're working at?
I love the tutorial--it's always fascinating to watch another artist's process.
Keep it up!

Anonymous said...

Fine, that is your process for drawing the picture, now please map out your process for landing such a wonderful woman.

Hatem said...

oh that's wonderful.. i've always wondered about your way of working..i thought it was digital :) ..very nice to see your process .

Michael Cho said...

Brian: Thanks, dude. You know I dig your work lots, right? As for the sizes, most of the stuff I do is small, and this one was about 10 1/2" x 5" approx. I used to work smaller when I worked with "real" brushes, but the markers/brushpens I use work better at a slightly bigger size.

Anonymous: my method is to leave a trail of chocolate pocky sticks to my door...

Hatem: thanks! I thought about doing these digitally, but I can't reproduce some of the more organic textures and strokes I need through software. At least, not at a speed that makes it worth while.

dintoons said...

your drawings are SO good!!...they have an old world charm...
great work michael! :)

crylic said...

amazing, i love you stuff beyond belief man...super inspiring

Michael Cho said...

dintoons: thanks -- I'm glad you like them. I don't consciously try to draw old-school, but I find that most of my influences are pretty classical, rather than contemporary.

Crylic: thank you -- your kind words are much appreciated. I'm glad I was able to inspire you!

Overvision said...

Your pencil work is exquisite.

O

Michael Cho said...

Thanks, Overvision! I often think my pencil work and my final art look very different, so I'm glad you liked the initial drawing.

P.S. PFunk is da BOMB!